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The coursework in LPO and the research assistantships with faculty provided the instruction and real-world research experience I needed to become a highly qualified educational researcher.
Samantha Viano, Ph.D.
Leadership and Policy Studies

Faculty
Graduate School of Education in the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University

Dr. Viano is a faculty member in the Graduate School of Education in the College of Education and Human Development at George Mason University. She joined the Mason faculty after completing her doctoral studies at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. She holds a Master of Science in Education degree from Northwestern University and earned a BS in Mathematics from Haverford College.

Dr. Viano has extensive experience as an education advocate, researcher, and journalist. Her experience teaching high school math in Chicago greatly informs her teaching and research. Her research focuses on evaluating the longitudinal effects of policies and programs that predominantly affect at-risk or traditionally marginalized student populations. This includes school climate and safety, school security, exclusionary discipline, teacher mobility, and online-credit recovery.

Dr. Viano's work has been supported by the National Institute of Justice Comprehensive School Safety Initiative. She was a 2017 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow.

When I entered the doctoral program in LPO, I came with a lot of ideas and passion for addressing educational inequities. What I knew I was lacking were the tools to accurately analyze and understand critical problems in education. The coursework in LPO and the research assistantships with faculty provided the instruction and real-world research experience I needed to become a highly qualified educational researcher. Faculty expect students to become fully equal collaborators in all aspects of their work, and these experiences directly contributed to my ability to publish independently and secure funding for my research.