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Peabody Journal of Education, Volume 84, Issue 1, 2009

INTRODUCTION

There is great discord amongst colleges and departments of education in the U.S. over the appropriate purpose of the doctorate of education degree, the Ed.D. In theory, the Ed.D. is intended to serve advanced education professionals, while the Ph.D. is reserved for the few that pursue a career in academia and educational research. Instead, however, blurred lines of distinction between the two degrees have resulted. This murky distinction between the Ed.D. and the Ph.D., along with the vast range in quality and rigor of education leadership programs, together call for a national discussion on the education doctorate. Guest editors, James W. Guthrie and David D. Marsh, begin this conversation through the collection of articles assembled for this special issue. This issue of the Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations presents the historical context in which the Ed.D. was originally conceived, an analysis of institutions' current practices of conferring the degree, and three examples of Ed.D. program models.

The issue begins with James Guthrie's argument for the need for two degrees of separate purpose, advocating against an all-in-one advanced educational leadership degree. He asserts that there must not only be separate degrees for practitioners and for researchers, but that both must be of sufficient rigor independently. An article by Ellen Goldring and Patrick Schuermann further illustrates issues with current Ed.D. programs nationwide. Goldring and Schuermann explore the changing context of school leadership and the necessary skills and knowledge for today's administrators, outline existing critiques of the Ed.D., and analyze the mission statements of education doctoral programs.

Much of this special issue is devoted to sharing current practice at three institutions known for having reputable, appropriately aligned Ed.D. programs. The Ed.D. degree program at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University is illustrated by Loss's explanation of the administrative considerations, Smrekar and McGraner's description of the capstone project which stands in place of the traditional dissertation, and Caboni and Proper's reflection on the program's development and implementation. Marsh and Dembo present practices at the University of Southern California, and Everson shares the case of Saint Louis University's program. A concluding piece by the guest editors recommends strategies for remedying the concerns presented within this issue.

It is our hope that this "Special Issue on the Education Doctorate" illuminates issues in current practice within the field, and calls attention to the need for dialogue between schools of education about reform. The Peabody Journal of Education would like to thank David D. Marsh and our editor, James Guthrie, for assembling this collection of work on the education doctorate. We hope our readers find this special issue intriguing and illustrative.


CONTENTS
Journal abstracts are linked to titles.

Introduction to the Special Issue on the Education Doctorate
James W. Guthrie and David D. Marsh
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 1-2.

The Case for a Modern Doctor of Education Degree (Ed.D.): Multipurpose Education Doctorates No Longer Appropriate
James W. Guthrie
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 3-8.

The Changing Context of K-12 Education Administration: Consequences for Ed.D. Program Design and Delivery
Ellen Goldring and Patrick Schuermann
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 9-43.

Building, Sustaining, and Expanding the Education Doctorate at Peabody College: An Administrative View
Catherine Gavin Loss
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 44-47.

From Curricular Alignment to the Culminating Project: The Peabody College Ed.D. Capstone
Claire Smrekar and Kristin McGraner
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 48-60.

Re-envisioning the Professional Doctorate for Educational Leadership and Higher Education Leadership: Vanderbilt University's Peabody College Ed.D. Program
Timothy C. Caboni and Eve Proper
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 61-68.

Rethinking School Leadership Programs: The USC Ed.D. Program in Perspective
David D. Marsh and Myron H. Dembo
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 69-85.

A Professional Doctorate in Educational Leadership: Saint Louis University's Ed.D. Program
Susan Toft Everson
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 86-99.

Strategies for Elevating the Public and Professional Regard of the Ed.D .
James W. Guthrie and David D. Marsh
Peabody Journal of Education, Vol. 84, No. 1: pages 100-106.