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Peabody Journal of Education, Volume 85, Issue 4, 2010

Special Issue on Immigration: Expanding Definitions and Examining New Contexts

 The answer to who is an American and to what types of education all Americans are entitled has varied over the United States' long history of immigration. The 1924 Immigration Act, which set severe quotas on the number of immigrants admitted to the United States, was not overturned until 1965, after which time roughly 28 million immigrants flooded the country. Given the current and often controversial debates on immigration, it is with great pleasure that the Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations presents this "Special Issue on Immigration: Expanding Definitions and Examining New Contexts". 

Guest editors Stella Flores and Christopher Loss of Peabody College at Vanderbilt University have organized a body of research that explores the intersection of immigration and education across an array of disciplines.  The collection of articles builds upon the rich history of immigration and proposes answers to some of the most pressing questions around immigration and education in this country. Flores and Loss begin this special issue by providing a brief historical context for the current debates on immigration. Each article that follows approaches immigration-related education problems from various perspectives and serves as a starting point, not a final destination, for further exploration.  

Mehlman-Petrzela lead off the collection with an article on the long-term effects of the Bilingual Education Act of 1968 in California. While this particular piece of legislation increased the federal government's concern over the educational attainment of limited-English-speaking students, it squelched the efforts of many local assimilation programs by increasing oversight and attacking the work of certain districts. In the following piece, Desai illuminates how artwork can inform current immigration debates in the United States. Using critical race theory, Desai examines how contemporary visual art can be used as a counter-narrative to explore the racialization of immigration in the United States and its relationship to education.  Next, Reyes explores the effect that Hurricane Katrina had on 15,000 Latino children from Louisiana, who became the silent victims in light of all the attention given to the Black-White race divide in relief efforts. Gonzales' qualitative study continues the focus on undocumented immigrants and explores why so many of them do not pursue college. In Owens' ten-year analysis of census data, she looks at how a race-neutral percentage policy affected the admission of foreign applicants to two public flagship universities in Texas. Batalova and Fix explore the role of English skills and literacy for immigrant adults' education and workforce development using nationally representative data. To close the issue, Suárez-Orozco, Suárez-Orozco, and Sattin-Bajaj provide an intriguing global comparison of immigrant integration programs from Vienna to El Paso through the lens of the ever-increasing population of immigrant youth. 

The Peabody Journal of Education would like to extend its gratitude to Stella Flores and Christopher Loss for coordinating this outstanding issue on immigration.  We would also like to thank each of the authors that contributed their insightful research.  We hope that the findings presented in this special issue provide an enlightening look into the intersection of immigration and education and serve as a starting point for future policy discussions.

CONTENTS
Journal abstracts are linked to titles.

Introduction to the Special Issue on Immigration: Expanding Definitions and Examining New Contexts  
Stella Flores and Christopher P. Loss 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 403-405.

Before the Federal Bilingual Education Act: Legislation and Lived Experience in California  
Natalia Mehlman Petrzela 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 406-424.

Unframing Immigration: Looking Through the Educational Space of Contemporary Art  
Dipti Desai
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 425-442.

The Immigrant Children of Katrina
Augustina Reyes 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 443-468.

On the Wrong Side of the Tracks: Understanding the Effects of School Structure and Social Capital in the Educational Pursuits of Undocumented Immigrant Students  
Roberto G. Gonzales 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 469-485.

Foreign Students, Immigrants, Domestic Minorities and Admission to Texas' Selective Flagship Universities Before and After the Ban on Affirmative Action  
Jayanti Owens 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 486-510.

A Profile of Limited English Proficient Adult Immigrants
Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 511-534.

Making Migration Work
Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, Carola Suárez-Orozco, and Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj 
Peabody Journal of Education: Issues of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations, Vol. 85, No. 4: pages 535-551.


 
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