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Sun-Joo Cho

Associate Professor of Psychology and Human Development, Department of Psychology and Human Development

Research topics include generalized latent variable models, generalized linear mixed-effects models, generalized additive models, and parameter estimation, with a focus on item response modeling.

Data complexity Dr. Cho has dealt with consists of (1) multiple manifest person categories such as a control group versus a treatment group in an experimental design, (2) multiple latent person categories (or mixtures or latent classes) such as a mastery group versus a non-mastery group in a cognitive test, (3) multiple item groups that may lead to multidimensionality such as number operation, measurement, and representation item groups in a math test, (4) multiple groups such as hospitals where patients are nested in a multilevel (or hierarchical) data structure, (5) repeated measures such as pretest and posttest in intervention studies, (6) intensive (many time points) binary, ordinal, nominal, and count time series (e.g., from eye-tracking, fMRI, emotional responses, dynamic treatment regimes, and N-of-1 or single case trials), (7) response processes (e.g., multinomial processing), (8) spatial dependence, (9) multiple sequences (channels), (10) nonlinear interactions, and (11) multiway categorical data.

Dr. Cho has collaborated with researchers from a wide variety of disciplines including reading education, math education, special education, psycholinguistics, clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, medicine, and computer science (artificial neural networks applications). She serves on the editorial boards of Behavior Research MethodsJournal of Educational Measurement, and Psychologial Methods. She was also named a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow (2013), a Vanderbilt Chancellor Faculty Fellow (2019-2021), and an Association for Psychological Science (APS) Fellow (Quantitative Field, 2020 - ). Dr. Cho has current research projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).